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Installation view at Northern Contemporary gallery in Toronto, ON

 
 

HOMUNCULUS, or the planets seen through my childhood window

As a child, I wanted to be an astronaut when I grew older. I spent countless hours using my viewmaster to explore the universe, imagining that one day I would see the planets with my own eyes. Recently, I found myself sleeping in my childhood bed. Once the feelings of nostalgia faded, thoughts entered my mind about failing to become who I wanted to be.

HOMUNCULUS, or the planets seen through my childhood window is an installation of photo-based work that draws upon these feelings of failed expectations and vulnerability, crafting a narrative that allows the viewer to visit seven fictive planets through a classic viewmaster. The figures on each planet are variations on the artist’s body after being 3D-scanned and 3D-printed. In addition to interpreting alchemical notions of the planets, the figures reference the compositions and themes found in Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, which features a boy exploring the universe to understand what coming-of-age means.

As an artist, my body and art are vessels to visualize my fictions, using my imagination to confront, categorize, and conquer troubling aspects of my reality.

 
 
 
People throw themselves into trains, said the little prince. But they’ve forgotten what they’re looking for, so they rush around in circles.
— The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupery
 
 
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As the little prince fell asleep in my arms, we looked at him in the moonlight and thought that what we see is only a shell. What is most important is invisible.
— The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupery
 
 

HOMUNCULUS

This video is a documentation of the 3D-rendering and 3D-sculpting of the figures in HOMUNCULUS, or the planets seen through my childhood window. The artist was photographed in a sphere by 130 DSLR cameras to create the 3D version of his body. Working with visualist Craig Reid, the artist’s body was morphed, stretched, and manipulated into seven different figures.

In this video, the viewer witnesses the creation of the Mars figure from beginning to end.